Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Chapter 6: Celebration of Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

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Chapter 6: Celebrations of Learning

Celebration of Learning

a Culminating grade-level or schoolwide event in which students present high-quality work to the school community, families, and members of the greater community. It is a public exhibition of student learning in academics an dteh arts that features student work and student reflection on learning. Examples are Expedition nights, Culminating Events, and Authors' Nights.

Why this Practice Matters

  • High Quality Work - Knowing your work will be displayed at a celebration of learning will provide more motivation to do better work.

  • Authentic Audience

    • Having people outside of the classroom/school makes the work real and more important

  • Communicating Learning

    • In a celebration of learning, the students are the ones presenting their learning success.

  • Reflection

    • It is essential for students to have many opportunities to reflect on their work. They must be able to explain how they got to their final product and why they made their revisions.

Getting Started

Key Decisions to Make
  • When will it occur during the year?

  • What space will be used?

  • How will you ensure high levels of attendance?

  • How will teachers ensure students demonstrate mastery of standards?

  • What will be shared?

  • What steps need to be taken to prepare students?

  • How will students discuss habits of scholarship?

  • How will teachers be supported?

  • Develop Structures

    • Determining the Focus of the Celebration

      • Classroom or Grade Level Based Celebration at the Conclusion of a Unit/Project

      • School-wide Celebration of Learning

    • Communicating with Families and Community Members

  • Defining Roles of Participants

    • Student Role

      • Involved in the entire process of preparing.

      • Responsible for presenting their work and reflecting on their progress.

    • Teacher Role

      • Carefully plans the Celebration (logistics, responsibilities, ext.)

      • Helps students practice and prepare

      • Provides appropriate learning targets and work models to build up to the event's presentation

      • Makes reflection a part of classroom culture

    • Audience Role

      • Help make the event feel more 'serious' and important

      • Actively participate in the event

      • Ask questions about the student's work

    • School Leadership Role

      • Support teachers with logistics and planning

      • Communicate with parents and personnel about upcoming event

In Practice

  • Deepening Student Learning

    • Connect Student Work and Celebrations of Learning to Standards

  • Teach Students Oral Presentation and Communication Skills

    • Use rubrics to define expectations for presentation

    • Model characteristics of a quality presentation and a weak one

    • Allow students to critique an oral presentation done by someone else

    • Provide multiple opportunities to practice

    • Prepare students for the sequence of events at the celebration

    • Allow students to Engage in a Professional Role at the Celebration (tour guide)

  • Reflecting on Learning and Achievement

    • Documentation Panels: visual representations of learning journey, they help students tell the story of their learning.

    • Reflecting on the Celebration of Learning Itself

      • Allow audience members to reflect on the celebration as well as the students and teachers.

Summary

This part of the process is the biggest investment! Organizing a Celebration of Learning is a big process that must be planned well in advance. I think if you planned it based on the long-term learning targets you have been working on, then it will all flow together. However, providing enough time for students to create their work, revise, then practice for the presentation is a lot to think about. This will be something that would work well for a grade level to complete together so the responsibility could be shared with more people.

This step is also the scariest to me. Not only is it a huge project, but it puts your student's work on display. Audience members will see the quality of work and attribute it to the teacher. It puts a responsibility on the teacher to make sure students rise up to the expectations of quality work, which is very hard to do with a large classroom!

Check out other chapters by clicking on the links below:

Leaders of Their Own Learning

  1. Learning Targets

  2. Checking for Understanding during Daily lessons

  3. Using Data with Students

  4. Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback

  5. Student-Led Conferences

  6. Celebrations of Learning

  7. Passage presentation with Portfolios

  8. Standards-Based Grading

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Chapter 5: Student-Led Conferences

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

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Chapter 5: Student-Led Conferences

Student-led coference

is a meeting with a student and his or her family and teachers during which the student shares his or her portfolio of work and discusses progress with family members. The student facilitates teh meeting from start to finish. This can be implemented at all grade levels. It puts students in charge of sharing informatino about their progress.

Why this Practice Matters

  • Building Student Engagement

    • Students pick work samples and present to parents. This builds greater pride in teh quality of what they do.

  • Building Responsibility, Organization, and Decision Making

  • Creating a Culture of Evidence

    • Passing classes is not about pleasing a teacher; it is about providing evidence of understanding and skill.

  • Building Strong Home-School Partnerships

    • Parents become an active participate in the conference and even contribute to academic growth of the child.

Getting Started

  • Developing the Structures to Get Started with Student-Led Conferences

    • How many per year?

    • End of grading period or middle?

    • Time allotment? (20 minutes for younger, 45 for older)

    • What will be shared?

      • General overview of all subjects? Or specific focus?

      • What kinds of evidence needed?

      • Will character growth be addressed?

      • Which staff members attend?

    • Scheduling for 100% parent participation

    • How will you encourage parents to participate?

    • How will you discuss issues that cannot be discussed in front of students?

  • Communicating with Families

    • Student-led conferences are a very different structure to what parents are use to.

    • Set expectation for 100% participation

    • Schedule for parent's convience (www.signupgenius.com/index.cfm)

    • Let them know the guidelines and procedures beforehand.

  • Determining the Agenda for Student-Led Conferences

Elementary Age Sample Conference Agenda

Welcome at the door , Sign in

5 minutes

Guided tour of all student work

5 minutes

Portfolio Review Indepth look at work

10 minutes

Parental and Teacher Feedback

5 minuts

  • Covering the Basics

    • Schedule well in advance

    • Prepare students for the conference

  • Defining Roles of Student-Led Conference Participants

    • Student Role: Lead the conference following the agenda.

    • Teacher Role: Set students up for success by having student-engaged assessment practices.

    • Family Role: Attend and pay close attention, offer feedback.

    • School Leader Role: Clear communication and logistical assistance.

  • Preparing Students for Student-Led Conferences

    • Need ample time to practice.

    • Provide a sample conference script

In Practice

  • Deepening Student Reflection and Learning

    • Portfolios

    • Updated regularly.

    • Include word that shows evidence of meeting standards, self-reflections, feedback, and rubrics.

    • It should show the story of student growth.

    • Have students write reflections on work they haven't looked at in a while.

    • Decide a portfolio sturcture/organization

    • Goal Setting

      • Students should set goals at the student-led conference.

      • Teach students how to set effective goals.

      • Goal setting is an ongoing and daily practice.

Summary

I had never thought of having a student led the conferences during the year! This makes so much sense. When we put students in charge of their learning, they become accountable and rise to the challenge. Also parents would be more likely to participate because it's their child who will be presenting. This could be very difficult to implement however. Just the management of setting up a portfolio to maintain is a huge task. Then having to teach and practice giving a conference so the students know what to do on the conference day seems like a big time investment. But I feel this alone will make monumentous improvments in student achievement!

Check out other chapters by clicking on the links below:

Leaders of Their Own Learning

  1. Learning Targets

  2. Checking for Understanding during Daily lessons

  3. Using Data with Students

  4. Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback

  5. Student-Led Conferences

  6. Celebrations of Learning

  7. Passage presentation with Portfolios

  8. Standards-Based Grading

Monday, June 18, 2018

Chapter 4: Models, Critiques, and Feedback

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Chapter 4: Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback

Let's start with a few definitions of these tools.

Models

Exemplars of work used to build a vision of quality within a genre. They can be drawn from current or prior student work or the professional world or can be teacher created.

Critique Lesson

Through critique lessons, students and teachers work together to define the qualities of good work in a specific genre or to think about the ways all students can improve their work through revision. This form of critique is a lesson, with clear objectives, and is designed to support the learning of all students.

Descriptive feedback

This my take place in the form of a teacher-student conference, written comments from the teacher, or during a peer-to-peer feedback session. This feedback specifically addresses a particular piece of work by a single student and intended to raise the quality of work toward the gold standard.

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Why This Practice Matters

  • Making Standards Real and Tangible

    • Students are able to see what the outcome looks like, which makes it more attainable.

  • Building a Mindset of Continuous Improvement

  • Instilling Responsibility and Ownership of Learning

  • Contributing to Collaboration and a Culture of Safety

Getting Started

  • Developing a Positive Culture for Critique and Descriptive Feedback

    • Be kind, Be specific, and Be helpful

    • Have a protocol

  • Choosing the Right Work Models

    • Exemplars don't have to be perfect, but do need to be good models of the learning target for that lesson.

    • Save student work to use as exemplars.

    • You can use weak work samples to model a target area, however make sure the work is totally anonymous. Also make sure to treat the work respectfully so the critique doesn't become mean-spirited.

  • Turning Critique Sessions into Standards-Based Critique Lessons

    • Define the Purpose for Each Critique Lesson

      • Focus could be on content, concepts, skills, product formats or genres, or habits of scholarship.

    • Determine the Right Timing in a Sequence of Curriculum for a Critique to Be Held

      • Introductory lesson to set high standards for quality.

      • In process to support revision

      • Just before final exhibition to fine tune the quality.

      • After completion of assignment to reflect.

    • Choose a Structured Format or Protocol to Match the Goals

      • The 2 well known protocols are 'collaborative assessment protocol' and the 'tuning protocol'.

      • Protocols help to define a sequence of discussion prompts, structure time, define roles, and define norms for the give-and take.

    • Two Types of Critique Lessons

      • Gallery Critique: All students' work is posted for everyone to view closely. It works best when the goal is to identify and capture only positive features in the selected work. The goal is to find effective ideas and strategies in strong examples that students can borrow to improve their own work.

        • Introduction: Teacher explains the steps and norms.

        • Step 1: Posting work (5 minutes)

        • Step 2: Silent gallery walk where students view all the drafts and take notes (5 minutes)

        • Step 3: What did you notice? Teacher led discussion where students only state what they noticed or identified, no judgments or opinions (5 minutes)

        • Step 4: What is working? Teacher led discussion of which aspects grabbed their attention or impressed them. Teacher also points out ones she is impressed with and explains why. (15 minutes)

      • In-Depth Critique: A single piece of work (or set of related pieces) is used to uncover strengths or to highlight common areas in need of revision or gaps in knowledge that need to be addressed.

  • The Role of the Teacher in the Critique Lesson

    • Be a Strong Guardian of Critique Norms

      • Make it clear the work is the subject of the critique, not the author.

      • Use "I" statements.

      • Begin comment with a positive feature in the work before moving to perceived weaknesses.

      • Frame ideas as questions rather than statements. ( Why did you choose to ____).

    • Keep the Critique Moving at an Interesting, Energetic Pace

    • Distill, Shape, and Record the Insights from the Critique

    • Focus on Naming the Specific Qualities and Strategies that Students Can Take Away with Them

      • This can be a step in the creation of a rubric.

    • Teach Vocabulary of the Standard/Learning Target, Content, and Product/Process.

  • Providing Descriptive Feedback to Individual Students

    • Focus on supporting the growth or an individual student or small group, improving a particular piece of work, performance, skill, or disposition.

    • Just between teacher and student or student and student, not for whole class

    • It is nested in a long-term relationship

    • Use strategic, positive comments instead of criticism

    • It flows from knowing the child and their needs, strengths and weaknesses, and their next steps.

  • Planning for Effective Feedback

    • Analyze and Adapt Your Current Means of Giving Feedback

      • Consider the 'How'

        • Timing: How often and when should feedback be given?

        • Quantity: How much feedback should be given?

        • Written versus Oral: What's the Right

        • Audience: What is the Right balance between Group and Individual feedback?

        • Tone: How words are used matters a great deal in giving effective feedback.

      • Consider the 'What' - the Content of Feedback

        • Focus: Focus on the work/task, process of learning, or way student self-regulates.

        • Comparison: Use past performance, benchmarks, and personal goals.

        • Function: Describe how the student has done in order to identify ways and provide information about how to improve.

In Practice

  • Developing Structures to make Feedback and Critique a Part of Daily Lessons

    • Identify Teacher-to-Student Strategies for Daily lessons

      • Structure individual conference times during work time.

      • Use small-group mini-lessons to address common areas of weaknesses.

      • Target one skill at a time. Connect feedback to learning targets and rubrics.

      • Assess effectiveness of feedback, see if student work improves.

    • Identify Peer and Self-Assessment Strategies

      • Teach the purpose and language of feedback.

      • Return to learning targets frequently.

      • Model giving effective feedback for students. Ask students use similar language.

      • Emphasize self-assessment over peer assessment.

  • Preparing Students to be Effective at Giving Peer-to-Peer Feedback

    • Students should be practiced in giving targeted feedback.

    • They should have clarity on the specific dimension of the work they are analyzing.

Summary

This chapter focused on the use of feedback and it's effectiveness. I learned more precise terminology for different strategies to use in giving students effective feedback. I will definitely try the gallery critique and the in-depth critique lesson formats in the coming year! The biggest challenge will be structuring work time to allow for conferencing with individual students.

Check out other chapters by clicking on the links below:

Leaders of Their Own Learning

  1. Learning Targets

  2. Checking for Understanding during Daily lessons

  3. Using Data with Students

  4. Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback

  5. Student-Led Conferences

  6. Celebrations of Learning

  7. Passage presentation with Portfolios

  8. Standards-Based Grading

Friday, June 15, 2018

Chapter 3: Using data with students

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Chapter 3: Using Data with Students

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Why this practice matters?

  • Empowers students to accurately assess their current level of proficiency in order to set challenging and effective goals.

  • Transforms student mindsets from a belief that intelligence is fixed to a belief in the power of their own potential to grow through effort.

  • Makes progress towards standards and makes grading transparent.

  • Makes students more responsible for their own learning.

Common Misconceptions about Data

  • Using Data is Only about basic skills and information.

    • Data can be used to assess critical thinking, clear communication, content knowledge, increased engagement, character, and production quality of work.

  • Use of data is only about test preparation

    • Embed data into classroom routines to improve student achievement and engagement.

  • Data collection is limited to quantitative data

    • Use rubrics, recording forms, journals, and other written data to analyze performance.

Getting Started

  • Creating a culture of safety for data investigation

    • Critical 1st step is to develop a classroom culture where it is safe to make mistakes and where a guiding belief is that effort leads to learning.

    • Foster a Growth Mindset in Students

  • Explicitly teach students about data

    • Use real life examples: sports page, retail sales, scientists/doctors

    • Use Collective Data: Everyone must scale the mountain - Start with a collective goal and collect data

    • Ensure Early Wins/Success

    • Focusing the Data Inquiry: See cycle

      • Assessment, Prioritize standards and collect data, organize and analyze data, identify areas of success and need, set goals, apply new skills and knowledge, assessment

      • Keep standards at the forefront

      • Begin with quantifiable data, something to count

      • Choose a recurrent data source

      • Make data matter, worthy of being counted.

  • Communicate with families

In Practice

  • Develop systems to support and deepen using data with students + Forms + Working folders and portfolios + Using digital tools

  • Build students’ capacity to set effective goals

    • Teachers serve as coaches in determining goals.

    • Not too easy, not too hard

    • SMART goals

      • S=specific

      • M=measurable

      • A=attainable

      • R=realistic

      • T-timely

Summary

This chapter helped me to understand the importance of using data with students so they can learn to determine areas of need and make goals for those areas. I’ve learned I need to scaffold this process, starting with a whole group goal and data collection, then moving towards individual goal setting. I will need to determine what kind of data the students need to collect and how they will monitor that data. This is probably one of the hardest parts of the student-engaged assessments process because there are so many things to monitor! However, if I start with one thing, then move to another, it won’t be so bad. Also I think having a learning target continuum posted will help students see what the goal should be.

Check out other chapters by clicking on the links below:

Leaders of Their Own Learning

  1. Learning Targets

  2. Checking for Understanding during Daily lessons

  3. Using Data with Students

  4. Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback

  5. Student-Led Conferences

  6. Celebrations of Learning

  7. Passage presentation with Portfolios

  8. Standards-Based Grading

Chapter 2

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Chapter 2: Checking for Understanding during Daily Lessons

Checking for understanding should be a daily practice for teachers and students. For teachers, this is the way we see if students are following along, understanding content and processes, and to adapt our teaching to misunderstandings or misconceptions. For students, this practice prepares them to stop and self assess their own thinking/learning. What better way to make students take ownership of their learning than by making them more accountable!

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Checking for Understanding Categories :

Teachers should use a variety of methods to check for understanding throughout each lesson.

  1. Writing and Reflection

  2. Student discussion protocols

  3. Quick checks

  4. Strategic observation and listening

  5. Debriefs

Why Does this Practice Matter?

  • Provides immediate information about progress toward standard or learning target mastery

  • Supports students towards meeting rigorous goals

  • Builds capacity for reflection

  • Prepares students for college and career

Getting Started

  • Laying the Groundwork

    • Build a classroom culture of trust and collaboration.

      • Treat students as partner in the learning process. Engage them in understanding and shaping learning targets, classroom rules and norms, project ideas, and every other aspect of learning.

      • Show students the rationale for curriculum and instruction and be transparent about the standards and important decisions.

      • Get to know students as individuals and continually assess and adjust practice according ot their readiness.

      • Create school and class wide norms that encourage everyone to persevere with challenging tasks and justify their thinking with evidence.

      • Model collaboration. Students need to see the adults in the school community working together, giving feedback, and being open about their questions and mistakes.

    • Structure lessons to support frequent checks for understanding

    • Pre-plan strategic questions to monitor student learning

  • Writing and Reflection Techniques (writing to learn, not learning to write)

    • Interactive writing (teachers and students work together to create a short writing)

    • Read-write-pair-share

    • Summary writing

    • Note catchers (graphic organizers)

    • Journals

    • Admission and exit tickets

  • Student Discussion Protocols

    • Back-to-back and face-to-face protocol (stand back-to-back and listen to questions/prompts then teacher signals to turn face-to-face to discuss)

    • Carousel brainstorm (questions are posted around the room and small groups of students rotate through each station and answer each question as a group)

    • Write-pair-share

    • Think-pair-share

  • Quick Checks

    • Factual or brief-response checks - Go-around (use for 1 or 2 word answers and go around the room quickly) - Write on individual dry-erase boards - Do now (brief problem, task, or activity that immediately engages) - Clicker Technology

    • Monitoring Confusion or Readiness - Explain it back - Table tags (students move to table that best represents their level of understanding) - Thumb-ometer or fist to five (shows degress of agreement or readiness) - Glass, bugs, mud (Understanding clear/glass, little fuzzy/bugs, none/mud)

    • Status Checks - Sticky notes on Continuum - Learning lineups (make a line across the room from beginner/novice to expert) - Human bar graph (make lines/bars to show understanding) - Scatter plot graph (like the human bar graph but without the lines)

    • Probing Deeper Understanding and Reflection

      • Hot seat (students answer questions under their seats and others respond)

      • Admission and exit tickets

      • Presentation assessments

  • Strategic Observation and Listening

    • Cold Call (drawing names randomly)

    • Warm call (take notes/talk to neighbor before names are randomly called)

    • No Opt Out (keep working on same question to it is answered correctly, people who didn’t complete must restate correct answers)

    • Think

  • Debriefs

    • Last chance in lesson to check for understanding

    • Return to learning target, elicit student reflection, probe for students to provide evidence for their own learning.

In Practice

  • Engage in targeted instruction to address gaps in understandings + Plan lesson, implement lesson. Check for understanding, make adjustments, check for understanding, plan next lesson

  • Teach students to monitor progress and set goals

  • Keep the right balance between consistency and variety of strategies

Summary

This chapter really showed me different ways to check for understanding throughout my lessons. I think this will be the easiest component to implement into my teaching!

Check out other chapters by clicking on the links below:

Leaders of Their Own Learning

  1. Learning Targets

  2. Checking for Understanding during Daily lessons

  3. Using Data with Students

  4. Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback

  5. Student-Led Conferences

  6. Celebrations of Learning

  7. Passage presentation with Portfolios

  8. Standards-Based Grading

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

Leaders of Their Own Learning

A New Beginning

As the 2018/2019 school year approaches, I am embarking on a new journey. I am leaving my former position as a Special Education teacher of 2nd graders. I am moving to a new school and becoming a 3rd grade homeroom teacher. This change has ignited my spirit and eagerness to improve my teaching practices. At my new school, Project Based Learning (PBL) is the norm and expeditionary learning is the protocol. This is very new to me and I am having to re-learn how to teach!

As I read and learn more about expeditionary learning and project based learning I am going to post about each step of the journey. I hope this will help other teachers who are new to PBL and need to know how to begin.

My first step in the process is to read Ron Berger's "Leaders of their Own Learning: Transforming Schools Through Student-Engaged Assessment". Ron Berger is the chief academic officer for Expeditionary Learning at Eleducation. This book consists of 8 chapters as seen below:

Introduction:

  1. Learning Targets

  2. Checking for Understanding during Daily lessons

  3. Using Data with Students

  4. Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback

  5. Student-Led Conferences

  6. Celebrations of Learning

  7. Passage presentation with Portfolios

  8. Standards-Based Grading

Each chapter describes a stage of Student-Engaged Assessment. Student-engaged assessment is a system of interrelated practices that positions students as leaders of their own learning. The following is a graphic to help understand the flow.

chart image

There are many reasons to use this structure. First of all it is very motivating for students. It will have each child taking ownership about their learning and making decisions to better themselves. It will help children (and grown-ups) change their mindset about intelligence. They will go from believing “You are smart because you are born that way.” to “You work hard and put forth effort and you will experience success.” Children will be taught and required to reflect on their learning and abilities. It will help create a culture of trust in your classroom where children respect and collaborate with each other naturally. This process will build the home-school connection by involving parents in the celebration of learning. And finally, it will give students’ a voice to their lives.

Chapter 1: Learning Targets

Learning targets are goals for lessons, projects, units, and courses. They are taken from standards and turned into student friendly language (I can ___). Learning targets help make learning clear and attainable. They make larger goals manageable and help students experience success.

Getting Started

  • Writing Learning Targets

    • Choose a standards-based lesson with which to get started

    • Write learning targets for the lesson: You need to make learning targets for this lesson focusing on what you want the children to learn, not make or do. Make sure the target is clear and manageable.

  • Using Learning Targets

    • Introduce the target at the best point in the lesson

    • Develop techniques to check for student understanding

      • hand signals

      • written checks

      • verbal check

      • progress charts

      • peer check-ins

      • quick quizzes

      • "Clicker" technology

In Practice

Long Term Learning Target

Supporting Learning Targets

I can overcome learning challenges by being an effective learner: taking initiative and responsibility, perserving and collaborating.

I can discuss and record what I notice and wonder about resources.

I can infer the topic of this module from the resources.

I can select a research reading book that I want to read.

I can talk with a small group, using complete sentences to tell why I chose my book.

1

  • Integrating Character Learning Targets

    • Use your school wide habits of scholarship or character expectations to set clear character learning targets.

  • Aligning standard, learning targets, and assessments

  • Considering the rigor of Learning Targets

    • The 3 types of learning targets are knowledge, skill, and reasoning. Teachers also need to consider the complexity of the students’ task and assessments. Knowing where the task falls on the matrix can inform backward planning, helping teachers ensure that learning targets will scaffold students’ learning. See the Cognitive Rigor Matrix Table

Recall and Reproduction

Basic Application of Skills and Concepts

Strategic Thinking and Reasoning

Extended Thinking

Remember

Recall or locate basic facts, details, events.

N/A

N/A

N/A

Understand

Describe or explain who, what, where, when, or how.

Explain relationships, summarize, identify main ideas.

Explain, generalize, or connect ideas using supporting evidence.

Explain how concepts or ideas specifically relate to other content domains.

Apply

Use language structure or word relationships to determine meaning.

Obtain and interpret information using text features.

Apply a concept in a new context.

Select or devise an approach among many alternative to research a novel problem.

Analyze

Identify whether information is contained in a graph, table, and so on.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze interrelationships among concepts, issues, or problems.

Analyze complex or abstract themes or perspectives.

Evaluate

N/A

N/A

Justify or critique conclusions drawn.

Apply understanding in a novel way, with justification.

Create

Brainstorm ideas about a topic.

Generate hypotheses based on observations or prior knowledge.

Develop a complex model for a given situation.

Articulate a new voice, new knowledge, or perspective.

Critical Moves for Deepening Student Engagement

In order for the practice of using learning targets to work, you have to get the students’ to internalize the value of learning targets and use them to assess their progress. Have students analyze and unpack learning targets to get a clear picture of what needs to be accomplished. When teachers use learning targets every day in every class, students will have a strong sense of responsibility and accountability for their learning.

Summary

In this chapter, I learned to create learning targets to help students take ownership of their learning. I need to identify what standards/lessons I need to teach and then create long term learning targets to address those goals. I then need to break down the long term targets into smaller, attainable supporting targets that scaffold up to the long term target. I need to keep in mind and differenciate my targets to incorporate all areas of rigor and levels of thinking. When teaching, I need to make sure students anaylyze the targets and internalize them. That way students will be motivated to take ownership of their learning and know exactly what is expected of them.

Thank you for reading my review/summary of the book "Leaders of their Own Learning" by Ron Berger.


1

Taken from EL Education 3rd grade curriculum

Monday, June 11, 2018

Chapter 3: Using Data with Students



Why this practice matters?
  • Empowers students to accurately assess their current level of proficiency in order to set challenging and effective goals.
  • Transforms student mindsets from a belief that intelligence is fixed to a belief in the power of their own potential to grow through effort.
  • Makes progress towards standards and makes grading transparent.
  • Makes students more responsible for their own learning.
Common Misconceptions about Data
  • Using Data is Only about basic skills and information.
    • Data can be used to assess critical thinking, clear communication, content knowledge, increased engagement, character, and production quality of work.
  • Use of data is only about test preparation
    • Embed data into classroom routines to improve student achievement and engagement.
  • Data collection is limited to quantitative data
    • Use rubrics, recording forms, journals, and other written data to analyze performance.
Getting Started
  • Creating a culture of safety for data investigation
    • Critical 1st step is to develop a classroom culture where it is safe to make mistakes and where a guiding belief is that effort leads to learning.
    • Foster a Growth Mindset in Students
  • Explicitly teach students about data
      • Use real life examples: sports page, retail sales, scientists/doctors
    • Use Collective Data: Everyone must scale the mountain
      • Start with a collective goal and collect data
    • Ensure Early Wins/Success
    • Focusing the Data Inquiry: See cycle
      • Assessment, Prioritize standards and collect data, organize and analyze data, identify areas of success and need, set goals, apply new skills and knowledge, assessment
      • Keep standards at the forefront
      • Begin with quantifiable data, something to count
      • Choose a recurrent data source
      • Make data matter, worthy of being counted.
  • Communicate with families
In Practice
  • Develop systems to support and deepen using data with students
    • Forms
    • Working folders and portfolios
    • Using digital tools
  • Build students’ capacity to set effective goals
    • Teachers serve as coaches in determining goals.
    • Not too easy, not too hard
    • SMART goals
      • S=specific
      • M=measurable
      • A=attainable
      • R=realistic
      • T-timely
This chapter helped me to understand the importance of using data with students so they can learn to determine areas of need and make goals for those areas. I’ve learned I need to scaffold this process, starting with a whole group goal and data collection, then moving towards individual goal setting. I will need to determine what kind of data the students need to collect and how they will monitor that data. This is probably one of the hardest parts of the student-engaged assessments process because there are so many things to monitor! However, if I start with one thing, then move to another, it won’t be so bad. Also I think having a learning target continuum posted will help students see what the goal should be. 

Check out other chapters by clicking on the links below:
1. Learning Targets
2. Checking for Understanding during Daily lessons
3. Using Data with Students
4. Models, Critique, and Descriptive Feedback
5. Student-Led Conferences
6. Celebrations of Learning
7. Passage presentation with Portfolios
8. Standards-Based Grading